The Walters Art Museum
www.thewalters.org
The Walters Art Museum
Warming Up (Coachman Drinking) Blauvelt studied with Charles Loring Elliott and at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the National Academy of Design. He pursued a career as a genre and portrait painter, before settling in Annapolis, Maryland where he taught draftsmanship at the Naval Academy. Blauvelt was among the artists whom William T. Walters encountered during his forays in the New York art market just prior to the Civil War, acquiring 5 works by the artist. Blauvelt specialized in small genre paintings, frequently of single figures.

Showing an elderly carter at a bar, this painting can be read as a less innocent pendent to WAM 37.1951, which shows a young boy standing in front of an open stove.
Antoine Ravel as Robert Macaire Baltimore artist Alfred Jacob Miller is known primarily for his paintings of the American West, but his interests extended beyond this subject. A prolific sketcher, he filled many journals with drawings and captions from the time he was studying in Paris and Rome (1833) until the 1870’s. The interests of Miller are clearly reflected in these sketches: the theater (a large portion being quick figure drawings of the Ravel Pantomime Troupe), studies of works by the Old Masters, literary illustrations, childhood memories, Baltimore scenery, and witty scenes of characters.

Depicted here is one of the original members of the Ravel PantomimeTroupe, a french family that toured America in the middle of the 19th century. The french pantomimes performed in multiple theatres in Baltimore. The shows included tight-rope dancing, ballet, and balancing acts in addition to the pantomime. The plots were so complex they were compared to those of the Italian Opera. As someone who frequented the shows, Miller has provided a view that is almost otherwise unrecorded.
The Valley of the Olives "The Valley of the Olives," is the largest surviving fragment of Inness’ monumental painting "The New Jerusalem." It was renamed after the artist re-worked the canvas following a serious accident that occurred in Madison Square Garden on April 20, 1880. The original large painting had been lent to an exhibition in the newly built entertainment center, only to be damaged severely when a wall and tower fell in on the gallery killing three people. Recent scholarship has shown that the original painting, thought to have been lost for over 120 years, appears to have been divided by the artist into smaller pieces, which he repaired and repainted removing the religious references. The Walters also owns a smaller fragement titled "Visionary Landscape" (see WAM 27.2775).
Indians in a Storm: Night Scene "We found among the North-Western Indians a belief in a great overruling power,- they believed also in an evil one, and while they regard suspiciously the former, take precious good care, also, to conciliate the favor of the latter… When a storm prevails, and thunder is crashing over their heads, they know nothing of positive or negative clouds approaching each other and discharging a surplus of electricity.  With them it is the ‘Anger of a Great Spirit,’ who is displeased with his children.  They become fightened, hang their heads, and deprecate his wrath;- their resolution for the moment is to do better.  These resoves pass off however as soon as the cause is removed;- their consciences beign quieted and reconciled by the appearance of clear weather."  A.J. Miller, extracted from "The West of Alfred Jacob Miller" (1837).

In July 1858 William T. Walters commissioned 200 watercolors at twelve dollars apiece from Baltimore born artist Alfred Jacob Miller. These paintings were each accompanied by a descriptive text, and were delivered in installments over the next twenty-one months and ultimately were bound in three albums. Transcriptions of field-sketches drawn during the 1837 expedition that Miller had undertaken to the annual fur-trader’s rendezvous in the Green River Valley (in what is now western Wyoming), these watercolors are a unique record of the closing years of the western fur trade.
Running Buffalo "The scene of action is near the cut rocks.  An Indian on a well-trained horse has separated a Buffalo from the herd and is about to have a shot at him, others are going pell-mell after the tretreating herd among the hills in the background.  In the immediate foreground is a horse unaccustomed to the chase, frightened at the unweieldly brute’s noise and confusion about him.  The prairie is admirably adopted to these hunts, from its level surface,- freedom from bogs, quicksand, and interruptions of any kind.  Hunters of the fox in civilized life would consider this hard work,- indeed to make a successful hunter of these huge brutes requires long practice both of men & horses, and is always attended with more or less danger." A.J. Miller, extracted from "The West of Alfred Jacob Miller" (1837).

In July 1858 William T. Walters commissioned 200 watercolors at twelve dollars apiece from Baltimore born artist Alfred Jacob Miller. These paintings were each accompanied by a descriptive text, and were delivered in installments over the next twenty-one months and ultimately were bound in three albums. Transcriptions of field-sketches drawn during the 1837 expedition that Miller had undertaken to the annual fur-trader’s rendezvous in the Green River Valley (in what is now western Wyoming), these watercolors are a unique record of the closing years of the western fur trade.
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#PatternReview and #Pics from the #SuperThursday Event on the blog {Link in My Bio}. #TheWaltersArtMuseum #InFullBloom #YetundeSarumi by yetundesarumi via http://bit.ly/1sTgzNY
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A Man Bust-length portrait of a man with brown curly hair, in dark blue or black coat with high white collar, jabot and vest.
Portrait of Colonel Alexander Smith (1790-1858) Colonel Alexander Smith served in the Morgan Volunteers, a Baltimore-based company of the organized militia of the state of Maryland during the 1830s (the organized militia being the ancestor of the modern day Army National Guard). The Morgan Volunteers were a specialized unit, armed with rifles supplied by the state armorer at Annapolis.  

This portrait and its companion piece (Walters 37.2774) are among Miller’s few early documented works. The colonel’s account book lists a payment of seventy-five dollars made for this pair of portraits on April 1, 1833.