The Walters Art Museum
www.thewalters.org
The Walters Art Museum
Indians in a Storm: Night Scene "We found among the North-Western Indians a belief in a great overruling power,- they believed also in an evil one, and while they regard suspiciously the former, take precious good care, also, to conciliate the favor of the latter… When a storm prevails, and thunder is crashing over their heads, they know nothing of positive or negative clouds approaching each other and discharging a surplus of electricity.  With them it is the ‘Anger of a Great Spirit,’ who is displeased with his children.  They become fightened, hang their heads, and deprecate his wrath;- their resolution for the moment is to do better.  These resoves pass off however as soon as the cause is removed;- their consciences beign quieted and reconciled by the appearance of clear weather."  A.J. Miller, extracted from "The West of Alfred Jacob Miller" (1837).

In July 1858 William T. Walters commissioned 200 watercolors at twelve dollars apiece from Baltimore born artist Alfred Jacob Miller. These paintings were each accompanied by a descriptive text, and were delivered in installments over the next twenty-one months and ultimately were bound in three albums. Transcriptions of field-sketches drawn during the 1837 expedition that Miller had undertaken to the annual fur-trader’s rendezvous in the Green River Valley (in what is now western Wyoming), these watercolors are a unique record of the closing years of the western fur trade.
Running Buffalo "The scene of action is near the cut rocks.  An Indian on a well-trained horse has separated a Buffalo from the herd and is about to have a shot at him, others are going pell-mell after the tretreating herd among the hills in the background.  In the immediate foreground is a horse unaccustomed to the chase, frightened at the unweieldly brute’s noise and confusion about him.  The prairie is admirably adopted to these hunts, from its level surface,- freedom from bogs, quicksand, and interruptions of any kind.  Hunters of the fox in civilized life would consider this hard work,- indeed to make a successful hunter of these huge brutes requires long practice both of men & horses, and is always attended with more or less danger." A.J. Miller, extracted from "The West of Alfred Jacob Miller" (1837).

In July 1858 William T. Walters commissioned 200 watercolors at twelve dollars apiece from Baltimore born artist Alfred Jacob Miller. These paintings were each accompanied by a descriptive text, and were delivered in installments over the next twenty-one months and ultimately were bound in three albums. Transcriptions of field-sketches drawn during the 1837 expedition that Miller had undertaken to the annual fur-trader’s rendezvous in the Green River Valley (in what is now western Wyoming), these watercolors are a unique record of the closing years of the western fur trade.
❤️ Happy FRIDAY!
#PatternReview and #Pics from the #SuperThursday Event on the blog {Link in My Bio}. #TheWaltersArtMuseum #InFullBloom #YetundeSarumi by yetundesarumi via http://bit.ly/1sTgzNY
Walking like Egyptians at #thewaltersartmuseum #motherhood #beayesmom #thebusymom by heidistjohn via http://bit.ly/1nVBGHD
#bts Getting ready for Jazz @ the Walters! This Thursday at 6pm featuring the legendary Carlos Johnson. Get your tickets at jazzatwalters.eventbrite.com. Event link in bio. ———————- #jazzatthewalters #baltimore #baltimorejazz #baltimoremusic #jazz #thewaltersartmuseum #jazz #carlosjohnson #bcjazzseries by bonneaucaprece via http://bit.ly/1sTghqx
A Man Bust-length portrait of a man with brown curly hair, in dark blue or black coat with high white collar, jabot and vest.
Portrait of Colonel Alexander Smith (1790-1858) Colonel Alexander Smith served in the Morgan Volunteers, a Baltimore-based company of the organized militia of the state of Maryland during the 1830s (the organized militia being the ancestor of the modern day Army National Guard). The Morgan Volunteers were a specialized unit, armed with rifles supplied by the state armorer at Annapolis.  

This portrait and its companion piece (Walters 37.2774) are among Miller’s few early documented works. The colonel’s account book lists a payment of seventy-five dollars made for this pair of portraits on April 1, 1833.
Young Diana
Portrait of Francois Joseph Talma This is a portrait of the French tragic actor François Joseph Talma (1763–1826), friend of the painter Jacques-Louis David and Napoleon Bonaparte. It was originally housed in one of Williams T. Walters’ many albums of drawings. The portrait was executed by Peale on his second visit to Paris in 1809-10. Four years later Peale opened a museum in Baltimore.
William Henry Seward (1801-1872) Waist-length, three-quarters to the right portrait of William Henry Seward, with grayish-brown hair, wearing a black coat, white shirt and wide black bow tie.

Secretary of State in Lincoln’s Cabinet, Seward was the Senator from New York. Despite initial differences, Seward and Lincoln became close friends.

John Chester Buttre is better known as an engraver and lithographer, especially of prominent nineteenth-century Americans.